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Monday, August 10, 2009

We are SAG


The Soul of SAG


From: "The Soul of the American Actor"
Commentary (2008)
by Rebecca Damon


We carry our union cards proudly.

They are a symbol of us binding together with others to form entities that champion our craft as a profession.

When we step on a set or a stage, the concern of the actor is their art.  Off set we have the opportunity and responsibility to participate in Guild processes and committees ensuring that those protections stay in place.

Sam Freed, SAG New York Division President said recently: “It did not occur to me when I ran for election for a position on the board of the New York Division of SAG that I was in any way taking on a position of leadership.  I recognize now that is exactly what I was doing.  I would learn that my initial motives of simply wanting to be able to assert my opinions in the process would also require a responsibility to listen to others who were in the room.  Leadership is manifest in a responsibility to others.  It requires the ability to present possible directions or actions.  It equally requires the ability to help a group come to a consensus that allows that group to move forward. That is how I see my responsibility as a leader.”

SAG New York Division Vice President Mike Hodge added, “Vigilance is just as important now as it was in those early years. This Guild was founded by members working in the industry.  It continues to be run by members working in the industry. Our constant participation is the only way we will be able to maintain the viability of this precious organization.”

It is a changing world and as technology evolves so does our craft.  Today SAG is providing protection for its members in the traditional media of film, television, commercials, and industrials as well as in new media forms that producers choose to utilize.

Recently SAG was instrumental in getting the state of New York to triple the film and TV tax credits for companies producing in New York to 30%.  Additionally, New York City has enacted a 5% credit bringing the total credit for projects in the city to 35%.  But it is more than just an organization fighting for actors’ salaries and working conditions, more than a labor organization fighting for an industry that is becoming increasingly global.  From the SAG Conservatory, the SAG Foundation’s Casting Access Project, and MORE’s Business of the Biz seminars, SAG offers a spectrum of workshops and programs to educate and inspire the membership.   These programs are about supporting an actor through all phases of their professional career.

It is a group of professionals that provides fellowship and programs to foster the growth of the actor.

It is an organization that is born out of the spirit of all the great thespian societies.

And, at its heart, at its soul, it is still the creation of six visionary performers who wanted nothing more then fair wages and working conditions.

At its soul, we are SAG.

You are the union.

Friday, August 7, 2009

V: Glossary Draft


This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch




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V
VARIETY - A weekly newspaper version of Variety, often called the “new bible” or “ongoing history” of the Entertainment Industry. Variety provides production updates that can be used as employment or contract leads by actors and other professionals in the entertainment industry. It tracks trends, personnel shifts and other entertainment business news. Variety is well known for “industry-speak”, the often-colorful shorthand or abbreviation of industry concepts both in headlines and within the body copy. Daily Variety is the Monday to Friday daily version published in Los Angeles. Major competitor: Hollywood Reporter. http://www.variety.com/

VERBAL  - Primary meaning is words and the use of words or symbols. Alternative meaning, also known as “vocal,” is the use of the voice, which may include inflection, accent and other tools, to communicate a thought, idea or action.

VHS - Video Home System. The most common home application for video reproduction. Used in the industry to distribute demonstrations or to see how the final product will look in its lowest audio and video quality (240 lines) distribution application. S-VHS, or Super VHS, is an improved and only partially compatible form of recording with a higher picture quality (400 lines). S-VHS is used for time shifting by local television stations and for fast transfer of demonstration “dailies” to production offices from remote locations.

VISUAL  - What is seen. The use of the image to communicate a location, time, thought or idea. This may include facial expressions, body language, cinema or graphic shorthand (such a crashing waves or a clock face), location and camera or special effects related to or used in necessary communication.

V.O. - Voice over. An off-camera voice coming either from an actor not in the frame, or from a secondary source such as a speakerphone or answering machine.

VOUCHER - Time slip with all pertinent information needed for getting paid properly.

VLA – Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts.






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This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch









U: Glossary Draft




This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch




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U
UNDERSCAN – The opposite of over scan, this image is the tightest possible, minimum image seen on the worst possible home receiver or theater projection. All directors make sure that any essential image or cue is contained within the under scan area.

UNDERSTUDY - A performer hired to do a role only if the featured player is unable to perform; used primarily in live theatre.

UPGRADE - The promotion of an extra performer in a scene to the category of principal performer.

UPM - Unit Production Manager - Oversees the crews and is handles the scheduling and all the technical responsibilities of the production.

UP STAGE - (a) The area located at the back of the stage. Down Stage is the area in front of the performer. (b) To draw attention to oneself at the expense of a fellow performer.



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This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch


T: Glossary Draft

This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch




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T
TAFT-HARTLEY - A federal statute that allows 30 days after first employment before being required to join a Union.

TAKE - The clapboard indication of a shot "taken" or printed. A take is what is captured on film or video between “speed” or “action” and “cut”. It can also mean on actor or creative professionals view of how a scene or segment should be done.

"TAKE 5" - The announcement of periodic five minute breaks.

TALENT SCOUT- a term, usually made-up for business cards, which could mean anything from an employee of an agent or casting company to someone selling products or services to actors, models and wanna-bes.
Do not assume they are legitimate or not-legitimate. Find our what is really behind the title and business card and move forward accordingly.

TELEPROMPTER - The brand name of a device that enables a broadcaster to read a script while looking into the camera lens.

THEATRICAL - TV shows or feature film work, as opposed to commercials or industrials. The term comes from the days when primary exhibition was in “movie” theaters and should not be confused with “legitimate” or “legit” theater, which refers to the live staging of plays or theatrical entertainment.

THREE BELLS! - An audible warning for QUIET because a scene is about to be filmed. This warning is heard on soundstages or at major studio complexes.

THREE DAY - a three-day contract in television.

TIGHT SHOT (Go in Tight) - Framing of a shot with little or no space around the central figure(s) of feature(s); usually a close-up.

TILT - The up and down movement of a camera.

TIME-AND-A-HALF - Overtime payment of 1 1/2 times the hourly rate.

TIME CODE - Box insert at the bottom of a screen indicating time in hundredths of a second.

TOP OF SHOW - The top salary other than the stars can expect to make on a given television production, regardless of role or experience.

TOTAL MANAGEMENT- Another name for personal manager, responsible for the entire packaging of an artist or project.

TRACKING SHOT - A shot taken while the camera is moving, either on a dolly or a mounted on a moving vehicle.

TRADEMARK - A legal protection indicating the origin of goods or images. Similar to a copywrite, but not necessarily tied to a specific work.

TRADES - Short for "trade papers" - The newspapers and periodicals such as the Hollywood Reporter and Variety that specifically feature information on the entertainment industry.

TRAVEL TIME- the time required to go to and from a set. There are limits set contractually to travel time. When these limits are exceeded, talent is paid additional for the time they spend traveling.

TREATMENT – A synopsis with main plot points.

TURNAROUND - (a) The number of hours between dismissal one day and call time the next day. (b) To shoot a scene from another direction.  Also referred to as “REST PERIOD”.

TWO-SHOT - A camera framing two persons.






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This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch











S: Glossary Draft




This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch





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S
SAG - Screen Actors Guild. The primary union for performers in motion picture and television productions. Shares jurisdiction with the American Federation of Radio and Television Artist on in joint contracts including ‘theatrical” and  “commercial”. SAG is a national union, with a structure that centers on elected officers and a national board of directors. Local branches assist in providing services to local members and recommending any local contracts or variations from national contracts to the national board. All funds are distributed through the national office, with general budgets and appropriate specific request administered by the elected treasurer and voted on by the National Board of Directors. Today the Guild represents a wide range of “on camera” and “voice over” talent (on film, on video and digital media), including actors, background extras, dancers, singers, stunt performers, puppeteers, “foley” and sound effects workers.   Formed as a performers union for the motion picture industry, as video evolved as a production format, organization of the video media extended Guild contracts jointly with sister union AFTRA to actors and performers on video and in interactive projects. http://www.sag.org

SAG ELIGIBLE - means an actor has fulfilled the requirements to join the Screen Actors Guild. This term, while in regular use, is considered to be a violation of copywriter and trademark by SAG, and therefore discouraged from use on résumé’s or with agents.

SCALE - Minimum payment for services under union contracts. Representing the negotiated minimum fair compensation for professional labor, “scale” is a floor and not a ceiling. Agents and talent are free to negotiate for additional compensation.

SCANNING - scanning refers to capturing or presenting an image with horizontal and/or vertical movement of light or electronic capture. Scan resolution determines the detail and qualities of an image.

SCENIC DESIGNER – Creates the physical look of a show.

SCRIPT - The written form of a screenplay, teleplay, radio or stage play.

SCRIPT SUPERVISOR - The crewmember assigned to record all changes or actions as the production proceeds. The Script Supervisor is part secretary, part clerk, part artist and part craftsperson. Keeping shots coordinated for continuity, or the logical uninterrupted positioning of props, costumes and other items in shot order, is an important part of the job for the Script Supervisor. The Script Notes are used during the filming and editing process to keep track of takes, camera lenses and other technical usage, reel or spool numbers and everything else needed for the Director and Editor to assemble the completed motion picture. Outside the US this position may also be referred to as Continuity Supervisor.

SDI - State Disability Insurance.

SECOND ASSISTANT DIRECTOR - Often two or three on a set, they handle checking in the talent, insuring proper paperwork is filed, distribute script revisions. Actors check in with the 2nd A.D. upon arrival on the set. The Assistant Directors carry the implied authority of the director in all areas of production, depending on specific production protocols. On larger productions there may be multiple second assistant directors, one of whom will be responsible for supervising PA’s or directly instructing background talent before, during and after the shot.

SECOND TEAM! - The verbal cue for the stand-ins to come to the set and be ready to stand in.

SECOND UNIT – A complete second production unit, including Second Unit Director, Cinematographer and crew, often used to capture exteriors or to assist in keeping the overall production on schedule by allowing the filming of two scenes or shots at the same time in differing geographic locations.

SEGUE - In film or tape editing, a transition from one shot to another. Also used in music and in music scoring.

SELF MANAGEMENT- Artists handle all aspects of their own career.

SERVICE MARK - Denotes origin of service.

SESAC - The Society of European Stage Authors and Composers, a performing arts organization-representing artist internationally. A second organization has formed in America using the same name, but applying to American Music as well as music around the world. It describes itself, as “Performing rights organizations, such as SESAC, are businesses designed to represent songwriters and publishers and their right to be compensated for having their music performed in public By securing a license from SESAC, for example, music users (i.e., television and radio stations, auditoriums, restaurants, hotels, theme parks, malls, funeral homes, etc.) can legally play any song in the SESAC repertory. Without a license from a performing rights organization, music users are in danger of copyright infringement." http://www.sesac.com. The same organization has an interactive site at .net.


SET - The immediate location where the scene is being filmed.

SET-UP - Each time the camera changes position.

SFX - Sound effects.

SHOWFAX- a talent paid service for delivery of scripts and portions of scripts used for audition (sides) originally over fax lines, but not primarily by computer. Prior to Showfax talent had to go to their agent’s office or to the casting directors office to pick up scripts in advance of the audition. From the Breakdown Service web site, the service “provides actors with Sides, which are the portion of a script that an actor will need to prepare to read for a part at an audition.” If the casting director or agents office is convenient, sides are still available free of cost for most projects from the agent or casting director. (www.showfax.com)

SHOW RUNNER – Same as an executive producer, referring to the producer who is actively involved in the project from beginning to end. Usually the SR Executive Producer is creatively responsible, with writers, directors and others reporting to them. It is a high-level “middle management” position in that the network, stars and financial backers also have a say in production decisions. In many ways, given current high budget lines for television, the SR produces the equivalent of ten to fourteen “movies” a year and is responsible for their success or failure. The term will not show up in credits, but with the long list of producers know that one of them is the Show Runner.

SIDES - Pages or scenes from a script, used in auditions or (if on a film set) those scenes being shot that day.

SIGNATORY - An employer who has agreed to produce under the terms of a union contract.

SINGLE CARD- indicates production talent who are established enough to have an agent negotiate having their name on the screen on it’s own, with no other name listed at the same time. In the Opening Credits the list is usually limited to the producers, director, stars and perhaps author or casting director. In the final credits a “single card credit” would have the actor or production professionals name on screen prior to the SCROLL.

SIMULCAST- Simulcast refers to transmission of an enhanced audio or video at the same time as it is transmitted on a lower or lesser standard. For talent radio simulcast may mean additional compensation, and in some cases if an image is transmitted at the same time over multiple networks or transmitters, additional compensation may be possible.

SIT-COM – Situation comedy format on TV, usually in a half hour format, often filmed before an audience, with rehearsal to filming taking place once a week.

SLATE - A small chalkboard and clapper device, often electronic, used to mark and identify shots on film for editing; also the process of verbal identification by a performer in a taped audition (e.g., "Slate your name!").

SOAP OPERA- A continuing storyline dramatic form in which both story and complications of the story are exaggerated and expanded to cover a long period of weeks or years. Differs from Novella’s in that soap operas have not specific beginning, middle or end to the ongoing drama. The term comes from the days of radio drama and later the early days of television, when this predominantly female-targeted commercial programming was sponsored exclusively by the manufacturers of soap and household cleaning products.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIP- A form of business where the owner is the boss and open to unlimited liability. The most common form of business organization, implied for artist who do not select another form of self-business structure, this is also the most vulnerable, because all assets, personal and business, are subject to collections or legal ramifications.

SPEED! - A verbal cue that the audiotape is up to speed for recording.

SPIKING THE LENS - Looking directing into the lens during a scene; since it destroys the illusion of realism, actors should never spike the lens unless specifically directed to do so for specific effect.

SSDC – Society for Stage Directors & Choreographers.

STEP SHEET – Skeletal list of scenes.

STAFF WRITER – An entry level writing position on a sit-com.

STAGE MANAGER (TV) – Onstage manager f the actors and their performance cues, liaison between cast and crew.

STAGE RIGHT - To the performer's right side, to the audience's left side. Likewise, STAGE LEFT is to the performer's left, the audience's right. Stage directions are for actors, not audiences; therefore they are always given from the actor's point of view to the audience.

STANDARD UNION CONTRACT - The standard format/contract approved by the Unions and offered to performers prior to the job.

STANDARDS & PRACTICES - The network TV censorship departments.

STAND-INS - Extra Performers used as substitutes for featured players, for the purpose of setting lights and rehearsing camera moves; also known as the second team. Stand-ins are often but should not to be confused with body doubles, stunt doubles or camera doubles, all of which appear in some way or another on film or tape.

"STICKS" - Slate or clapboard. The board itself, the writing and sometimes digital visual images on the slates are used to mark the shot and scene designation for later use in editing, to track film or video tape location and allow for organization in an industry where content is often shot out of chronological order. The clap or “stick” is used to produce a noise to synchronize sound to the visual image. A second definition would include any tripod or method of mountain and keeping a camera stable while filming.

STOP DATE- the date a production promised to be the final date for which an actor is on hold for a production, and therefore the date after when the actor can book other work.

STORY BOARD- a method of planning out camera angles and shots, usually represented in drawings, photographs or clipping presented with the dialogue or script scene description below each “frame”, comic book style. Video story boarding has also become popular, in conjunction with laptop computers and portable video or DVD playback. The classic examples of story boarding for film can be found in the works of Alfred Hitchcock.

STORY OUTLINE – A scene-by-scene narrative.

STUDIO FLOOR – Performance area.

STUNT PERSON – Doubles for the actors in situations beyond the actor’s physical ability or reasonable level of risk.

STRIKE- To take down or take apart a set and leave an area as it was prior to filming or a stage clean and ready for the next set. Another meaning of the word ‘strike’ is a job action whereby members of a union withhold their services in an organized working conditions and benefits dispute.


STUDIO - A building, recording room or sound stage that accommodates film or TV production.

STUNT COORDINATOR - The person in charge of designing and supervising the performance of stunts and hazardous activities.

STUNT DOUBLE - A stunt person who performs stunts for a principal.

STUNTPERSON - A specially trained performer who actually performs stunts. Also STUNT MAN, STUNT WOMAN, STUNT PLAYER and STUNT PROFESSIONAL.

SUBMISSION - An agent's suggestion to a casting director for a role in a certain production.

SUBSIDIARY RIGHTS – A share of an author’s profits from film, TV, and fees paid for amateur productions.

SW - A notation on a call sheet that an actor is starting on that day and working on that day.

SWF - A notation on a call sheet that an actor is starting, working, and finished on that day.

SWEETENING - In singing/recording, the process of adding additional voices to previously recorded work.

SYNC LICENSE - A license required when music is used to accompany film, video, on-screen images or in commercial settings.

SYNDICATION - Selling TV programs to individual stations rather than to networks.

SYNTHESPIANS – Computer generated actors used to replace live action, create life like animation or allow for major physical morphing and alterations. See also Motion Capture, Performance Capture and Special Effects. Synthespians may involve the use of live actors or voice artist or, in the very near future, may be done by computer artist using existing databases. Synthespian technology will make possible the creation of new works using artist who have passed away, or the merging of characteristics of two separate actors or artists.








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This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch










R: Glossary Draft

This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch



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R

RECURRING- a role in which an actor will appear more than once on episodic television or in a series of film portraying the same role. While stars and series regulars are recurring roles, the term recurring applies to guest stars and featured players only.

REGULAR- a star or co-star in episodic television, or a member of an ensemble seen in almost very episode. SERIES REGULAR may also be used.

RELEASE PRINT- Release print refers to the actual film released to theaters or other distribution channels, read for commercial projection or duplication.

RECOUPMENT – The point from which profits flow.

RESIDUAL - The fee paid to performers for rebroadcast of a commercial, film or TV program. With commercials these are referred to as “use fees”. In the recording industry similar forms of compensation are referred to as “royalties”.

RESOLUTION - Resolution refers to the amount of detail in a displayed image. It is usually referred to in terms of amount of pixels (picture elements) for horizontal and vertical. Scans.

RESUME - List of credits, usually attached to an 8x10 or composite. While printing or glue may be used, it is usually recommended that staples on all four corners are the best method of attachment to assure that photo and resume remain together in an agent or casting director’s files.

RETAKES- having to shoot the same scenes again, usually because of a technical difficulty or cast change.

REVERSE SHOT- Changing the camera perspective to the complete opposite or reverse of where it was before. Often used in POV or point of view shots.

REWRITE - Changes in the script, often using color-coded pages to indicate most current version.

RF- Radio Frequency, of the frequency radios transmit on. RF on a set is usually used to refer to interference with radios or recording equipment caused by the use radio frequencies for outside the production, such as passing planes, television transmitters and cordless telephones.

RIDER- any additional requirements added to a contract. In the recording and live music industries riders may include the availability of a humidifier, specific food or beverage needs, certain sound or lighting requirements, specific transportation, specific housing accommodations, the availability of comp (complimentary or free) tickets and so on. Tech and Hospitality are two common forms of riders.

RIGHT-TO-WORK-STATES - Those states that do not honor certain union provisions. Referred to as “right to work for less” or “right to fire” states by union activist, these states may allow work to be performed on union worksites without requiring the worker to join a union.

ROAD (THE) – Touring with a show.

ROLLING! - The verbal cue for the camera film and audiotape to start rolling. In the digital age the call “rolling” indicates that the camera is in use and capturing images and/or sound. With video “SPEED” is usually substituted, to let the director know that the image will be captured on the tape. Most modern equipment is almost instantaneously at “speed” but the tradition of marking the sound and video with “speed” continues to assist in the performance and editing functions.

ROOM TONE - A sound recording (sometimes made upon completion of a scene) to record existing noise at the location. Also called "wild track”, “ambient sound” or “cloud noise”.

ROUGH CUT- is the editors’ first version of the final product, usually presented to show the editors vision of the film or project. Such additional sweetening as soundtrack, sound effects, Folly work and other special effects are usually not included in a rough cut.

ROYALTY - A percentage of the sale of an artist product paid to the artist by the distributor of the product. This is the major source of income for most recording artists. It is similar to residuals in film and use fees in commercial television.

ROYALTY POOL - To speed up recoupment of funds invested, in a profitable week 40% is set-aside for investors in a special account labeled the royalty pool.





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This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch


Q: Glossary Draft



This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch



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Q
QUICK CHANGE- In theater and in live television talent is sometimes required to change clothing or costume rapidly. These changes are referred to a quick changes.

QUIET LIGHT- a light on the soundstage that when lit means that there should be ‘quiet on the set”. In live broadcasting a red light reading “on air” or “recording” is lit outside of the broadcast area and in the studio when the facility is live or tape is rolling.





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This site is a work in progress, and will be a part of an expanded web site under the home address of www://artlynch.org. Any additions, corrections, ideas, guest material are greatly appreciated. Please also review the material located along the right hand column, then contact me at art.lynch@artlynch.org. No funds are collected or directly solicited by this site. Google Ads are used to expand Google search and tools reach. Web assistance and a web master are also being sought. Thank you in advance. -Art Lynch







Vocabulary: Brought to You by the Letter P

Any production or industry terms that begin with the letter P that you feel should be added, or corrections, expansions or examples of any of the term listed below, please send to Art.Lynch@artlynch.org. Thank you in advance.

P
P.A. - Production Assistant. The grunt workers and apprentices of the industry, PA’s assist the producers, director, assistant directors and crew as needed. They work in all aspects of the industry, from the office to locations, studios to assisting location mangers. The PA also refers to the “Performers Alliance”, a political group within the Screen Actors Guild in the 1990’s.

PAL- Phase Alternation by Line. A common composite color transmission system used in most of Europe, Africa and elsewhere. Competes with NTSC, the North American Video Standard.

PAN - A camera shot which sweeps from side-to-side.

PARTNERSHIP - Two or more people agree to combine resources into a business. Limited Partnerships limit the scope of the business agreement and the responsibilities of those involved.

PAYMASTER - An independent talent payment service acting as the employer of record. This title may also apply to the individual with whom the responsibility of an accurate and on time payroll is placed.

PENSION & HEALTH PAYMENT - An additional amount of money paid by the employer to cover employee benefits under union contract

PER DIEM - Fee paid by producer on location shoots to compensate performer for expenditures for meals not provided by the producer.

PERFORMANCE CAPTURE – The use of an actor to create the actions or to act our movements and scenes which are then digitized and used as the basis of a “computer generated” character or object. Also known as “Movement Capture” or “Motion Capture”. Actors are championing the term “performance capture” because it implies an actor’s creative control over character through movement and performance. Producers go for the more technical “motion capture” because it implies that the real art and creation is not in the movements caught on the computer, but in the work done by technicians on characters who never existed in the “real world.” http://www.jerrygelb.com/movies/PerfCapsm.mov

PRE-PRODUCTION - The phase of filmmaking before shooting begins; includes writing, scouting locations, budgeting, and casting, hiring crews, ordering equipment and creating a shooting schedule.

PERSONAL MANAGER - A manager who assists artist or projects by suggesting or mandating specifics in image, training and marketing. Managers also may secure employment for artist, except where prohibited by state law. A William Morris Agency talent agent described personal managers as ‘human day-timers’ who ‘keep on top of their artists’ schedules, images and practices’.

PHOTO DOUBLE - An actor cast to perform on camera in place of another.

PICK UP - Starting a scene from a place other than the beginning.

PICTURE'S UP! - Warning that the sequence of cues to shoot a scene is about to begin.

PILOT- a film or video project designed to sell a television series for further production. PILOT SEASON, while in readily year round, traditionally held auditions in the fall and later winter and shot or lensed the actual programs in the early Spring for display at programming conventions or “shopping around” to the networks.

PINKS - usually the color paper used for the first set of revisions of a shooting script.

PITCH - Sometimes called ‘pitching ideas’ or ‘concept pitch’, in television and film the pitch involves telling the highpoint of the story line and focusing on its selling points to find financing or distribution for a project. Part of the marketing process, the pitch usually involves those who have the original idea and whatever creative team is assembled early on.

PIXEL - A single element of digital projection, or the tiniest point of a TV, scanner or print image.

PLAYERS GUIDE - A directory of talent similar to the Academy Players Directory, only specializing in east coast talent based out of or near New York City. This publication is a partnership between the Spotlight (a directory of United Kingdom Talent) and the Breakdown Services. http://www.playersguideny.com

POLLSTAR - A trade magazine used to promote and provide tour information for the live and recording artist industries. The magazine provides tour schedules, concert grosses and additional information about major artist, performers and groups.

POST-PRODUCTION - The phase of filmmaking that begins after the film has been shot. Includes scoring, sound and picture editing, titling, dubbing, and releasing.

POV SHOT - Point-of-View shot; camera angle from the perspective of one actor.

POWER OF ATTORNEY- a legal document allowing someone to act as a manager, agent, attorney or decision maker for another person. This is most often used to allow manager, agents or attorneys to handle funds directly and to sign agreements for talent.

PRESS AGENT- The person or company hired to promote an artists career, specific product or business. Press Agents are also utilized to provide damage control or protect an artist right to privacy.

PRESS JUNKET- the media interview and photo opportunity events arranged by Press Agents to promote and artist, project or company. Usually these involve travel to multiple markets or meetings in locations attractive for press participation.

PRESS KITS- a marketing tool assembled for presentation to members of the media for purposes of promotion of an artist, project or company. In the recording industry such kits usually contain at least two black and white glossy photos, a color ‘album cover’ glossy photo, a biography, select reviews, a sample (CD, video, CD-ROM, DVD, or demo tape) and other pertinent content. DVD’s and DVD-ROMs are rapidly becoming the currency of choice for press kit promotion, containing audio, video, print and other resources easily accessible by the media on their computers.

PRINCIPAL - A performer with lines.

"PRINT!" - A call from the director at the end of a take that that particular take is good enough be printed.

PROCESS STAGE - the soundstage where special effects are filmed against a blue or green screen. In the pre-computer age a process stage would be where projections occurred behind the action to show moving backgrounds or special sequences without endangering the actors.

PRODUCER – The person who assembles all of the business and creative elements of a production, sometimes the primary source of funds or the individual who assembles the funds needed to produce a play, film, television, or music project. The Line Producer is the person responsible for the day-to-day decision-making on a production. As creative or decision-making powers are enhanced writers or other talent may grow into the title producer, either by merit or contractual negotiation. Beware the title ‘producer’ as in today’s marketplace the use of the title has become epidemic in scale including many who have minimal contribution to the project.

PRODUCTION COMPANY - The company actually making the film or television show.

PRODUCTION DESIGNER – Responsible for designing everything you see on film that does not move (meaning the actors).

PROJECT- The product to be marketed, bought and sold is most often described as the project.

PROMOTIONAL AND TOUR SUPPORT - Funds negotiated from the motion picture, television, recording or distribution company to assist in paying for promotional tours, events or tools.

PROPS - Any objects used by actors in a scene.

PSA - Public Service Announcement.

PUBLICITY – Unpaid advertising.

PUBLICIST – Responsible for publicizing actors, directors, writers and film or theater projects on a per project or long-term basis (see Press Agent).

PUNCH-UP - Taking a script and working on improving it or to make it more marketable is referred to as punching-up a script.




Any production or industry terms that begin with the letter P that you feel should be added, or corrections, expansions or examples of any of the term listed below, please send to Art.Lynch@artlynch.org. Thank you in advance.