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Tuesday, December 17, 2013

SAG and the Golden Globes...plus Steve Coogan Talks 'Philomena,' Tabloids and Being Typecast

Steve Coogan Talks 'Philomena,' Tabloids and Being Typecast
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Steve Coogan discusses why he made his new movie Philomena. He reflects on his career both in the UK -- where he's often been typecast as a comedian -- and the US -- where he has a loyal but "under the radar cult following." Coogan also discusses his experience of being the object of "tabloid intrusion" and how fighting against the UK tabloid press has brought him self-respect.

BANTER

Hollywood News Banter 

Kim Masters and John Horn of the Los Angeles Times discuss some of this week's top entertainment news stories.
Awards season is here: What do the SAG and Golden Globe nominations really mean? The Wall Street Journal points out that this is the busiest film holiday season on record. That could be because thanks to the Academy inching up their awards each year, compressing all other "predictor"  awards. But has this also led to the predictors having too many choices and no criteria to make predictions? And have studios upped the dollars spent on each award nomination for every award to make it more about marketing than reality.  

The Golden Globes represents 90 journalist, mostly part time, writing for foreign publications.

The Foreign Press Association has two classifications for best film, with very odd qualifications. Oprah Winfrey was not nominated for a SAG Actor Statue, but her films were nominated for ensemble films (the closed thing that the SAG Awards has to Best Picture). A strong summer and strong fall make predictions difficult. Diversity seems to be the rule.

Over 138,000 members of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG-AFTRA) are invited to vote on the union's nominations. One question remains to be answered: how will the merger with recording artists, broadcasters and others charge the chemistry of the vote, if at all.

'The Sound of Music Live' was a hit -- expect more musical event programming to follow. NBC has already announced it will repeat "The Sound of Music" as a holiday event, as they did decades ago with Mary Martin and the live stage version of "Peter Pan." Network produced "live events" are not something new, in fact they are a resurrection of a popular trend during the "Golden Age of Television."  Almost 19 million viewers shocked even NBC, with a non-actor in the lead. In the heartland of American people loved it, but on both coast comments were more snarkey. Meanwhile NBC is seeking its next musical of board appeal with a major singing star in the lead. Formula's seem to work, until they are done until they become the has been stereotype, which could happen with musical theater done live on network TV. After all NBC is not PBS and the target demo is one with low live theater attendance (18 to 34).

 

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Steve Coogan on acting and the industry


Steve Coogan is an actor, writer and producer whose credits include The Trip, Night at the Museum (miniature Roman Emperor), Hamlet 2, Tropic Thunder and I'm Alan Partridge. His new movie is the Golden Globe-nominated Philomena. He talks with Kim Masters about wanting to make a movie that has something meaningful to say, to "contribute to the sum total of human happiness." Coogan also reflects on his career both in the UK -- where he's often been typecast -- and the US -- where he has a loyal but "under the radar cult following." He says he may be more famous in the UK but he's "hipper" in the US. Coogan also discusses his experience of being the object of "tabloid intrusion" and how fighting against that has brought him self-respect.

The UK has theater and other divisions, including that comics do not to drama. in the US an actor can do both theater and film, television and commercials. They are accepted in comedies and dramas.

Enjoy and take advantage of the flexibility as an actor, writer or director. But then, even in the US, typecasting exists and many actors take ti to the bank.





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