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Wednesday, April 30, 2014

FILMMAKERS ON ENGAGING THE AUDIENCE




As with all the arts, it is the relationship between audience and work that sustains the life of the created object, and this truth underlines the importance of the filmmaker and his or her respect for the viewer. The filmmaker should allow the audience to participate in the storytelling, to allow the viewer’s imagination and emotions take part in the film.
Sixteen filmmakers from different parts of the world and different time periods share their insight on how to communicate with the spectator in order to create timeless films. As Stanley Kubrick suggests, when the filmmaker places the viewer in a position of discovery, the thrill of the film goes through the heart.
Read, Learn, and Absorb!
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Steve McQueen
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Stanley Kubrick
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Michael Haneke
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Shane Carruth
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Andrei Tarkovsky
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Sidney Lumet
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Jean-Luc Godard
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Derek Cianfrance
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THERE ARE FILMS MADE TO EXIST AS BOX OFFICE RESULTS FIRST, OR AS REVIEWS FIRST, OR AS EXPRESSION OF THE AUTHOR FIRST. MY FILMS ARE MEANT TO COME TO LIFE IN PEOPLE’S HEADS. THEY ARE INCOMPLETE BEFORE, ACTUALLY THEY ARE MEANT TO BE INCOMPLETE. I SEE THEM LIKE OPEN SYSTEMS THAT NEED TO BE PULLED TOGETHER BY SOMEBODY. THAT SOMEBODY IS EACH AND EVERY SPECTATOR. IN A WAY I THINK OF FILMS THE SAME WAY I LOOKED AT STORIES IN BOOKS, WHEN I WAS LITTLE. I REALIZED VERY EARLY ON THAT THE STORY WAS NOT IN THE WRITTEN WORDS, BUT IN THE SPACE BETWEEN THE LINES. THAT’S WHERE THE REAL READING TOOK PLACE: IN MY IMAGINATION, AND THAT HAPPENED IN ALL THE WHITE BETWEEN THE LETTERS AND THE LINES. AND WHEN I STARTED TO SEE FILMS, I APPROACHED THEM THE SAME WAY. IN FACT THOSE FILMS ALLOWED ME TO PERCEIVE THEM LIKE THAT, THEY WERE ASKING ME TO DREAM MYSELF INTO THEM. THE CLASSIC AMERICAN CINEMA HAS THAT SAME SPECIFIC QUALITY, AND THIS IS ALSO THE GREAT TRADITION OF EUROPEAN CINEMA. I DID NOT INVENT THAT “METHOD.” IT IS AN ENDANGERED PROCESS, THOUGH, THESE DAYS. MORE AND MORE FILMS COME AS “WALL TO WALL” ENTERTAINMENT. WHAT YOU SEE (AND HEAR!) IS WHAT YOU GET. NO MORE SPACE BETWEEN THE FRAMES, SO TO SPEAK. NO CHANCE TO SNEAK IN WITH YOUR IMAGINATION, TO DREAM ON AND TO PROJECT YOUR INNERMOST HOPES OR FEARS OR DESIRES INTO WHAT YOU SEE AND THEREBY PUSHING IT FURTHER. YOU COME OUT OF THE THEATRE AND FEEL STRANGELY EMPTY. FOR TWO HOURS YOU WERE PREVENTED FROM PARTICIPATING. YOU WERE OBLIGED TO “WITNESS” INSTEAD. AND THAT IS THE OPPOSITE TO WHAT YOU CALLED MY “METHOD” WHICH IS IN THE TRUE SENSE OF THE WORD “INTERACTIVE.”
Wim Wenders
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Olivier Assayas
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Christopher Doyle
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John Cassavetes
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Robert Altman
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John Sturges
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Victor Erice
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Andrei Tarkovsky

Groucho Has Driftwood- Night at the Opera


Actors need to know about eye contact (which choice would your character make)

Just Look Me in the Eye Already

THE WORKPLACE PERILS OF STARING AT OUR PHONES AND ELSEWHERE; THE IDEAL GAZE LASTS 7 TO 10 SECONDS


Eye contact occurs when "two people look at each other's eyes at the same time."[1]
In human beings, eye contact is a form of nonverbal communication and is thought to have a large influence on social behavior. Coined in the early to mid-1960s, the term has come in the West to often define the act as a meaningful and important sign of confidence and social communication.[2] The customs and significance of eye contact vary widely between cultures, with religious and social differences often altering its meaning greatly.
The study of eye contact is sometimes known as oculesics.[3]
-Wikipedia

You're having a conversation with someone and suddenly his eyes drop to his smartphone or drift over your shoulder toward someone else.
It feels like this is happening more than ever—in meetings, at the dinner table, even at intimate cocktail parties—and there are signs that the decline of eye contact is a growing problem.

From the Wall Street Journal (click here).

See also: What the end of eye contact means (video)
Adults make eye contact between 30% and 60% of the time in an average conversation, says the communications-analytics company Quantified Impressions. But the Austin, Texas, company says people should be making eye contact 60% to 70% of the time to create a sense of emotional connection, according to its analysis of 3,000 people speaking to individuals and groups.
Eye contact is declining in both work and social settings, and it's having a negative effect on our sense of emotional connection ability to influence or impress others. Work & Family columnist Sue Shellenbarger and Ben Decker, president of consulting and training firm Decker Communications, join Lunch Break to explain.
One barrier to contact is the use of mobile devices for multitasking. Among twentysomethings, "it's almost become culturally acceptable to answer that phone at dinner, or to glance down at the baseball scores," says Noah Zandan, president of Quantified Impressions. (A common feint, texting while maintaining eye contact, not only is difficult but also comes off as phony.)
Some psychologists point to FOMO, or "fear of missing out" on social opportunities, says a study published earlier this year in Computers in Human Behavior. Young adults who are dissatisfied with their lives or relationships feel compelled to check mobile gadgets repeatedly to see what social opportunities they are missing—even when they don't enjoy it, the study says.
Because of the trend toward home-based and other remote work, people have become accustomed to talking without making eye contact, says Dana Brownlee, founder of Professionalism Matters, a corporate-training company in Atlanta. She cites a manager at a South Carolina financial-services company who started offering prizes to get employees to meet face to face. "People were dialing into meetings from offices that were literally just a few cubicles down the hall," Ms. Brownlee says.
Dominic Bugatto
Yet eye contact can be a tool for influencing others. Looking at a colleague when speaking conveys confidence and respect. Prolonged eye contact during a debate or disagreement can signal you're standing your ground. It also points to your place on the food chain: People who are high-status tend to look longer at people they're talking to, compared with others, says a 2009 research review in Image and Vision Computing.
When people withhold eye contact out of carelessness or disrespect, it speaks volumes. Suzanne Bates, author of "Speak Like a CEO," has coached executives who check their smartphones so often during meetings that "it's the equivalent of not showing up for half the meeting," she says. Employees get the message that they're not important and typically resent it, thinking, "I'm just as busy as the CEO. I just have different things to juggle," says Ms. Bates, chief executive of Bates Communications, Wellesley, Mass.
Holding eye contact works best for 7 to 10 seconds in a one-on-one conversation, and for 3 to 5 seconds in a group setting, says Ben Decker, chief executive officer of Decker Communications, a San Francisco-based training and consulting firm. Mr. Decker, whose company has been in business for 34 years, says that people who avert their gaze too soon, or avoid eye contact altogether, are often seen as "untrustworthy, unknowledgeable and nervous." Someone speaking to a group needs to look at many listeners so that no one feels left out or singled out.
When sales-training executive Lisa Contini consulted Decker to improve her communication skills, she found eye contact was a key piece of the puzzle. She used to drop or close her eyes during conversations. "I was pausing to formulate what I wanted to say, but it came across as if I didn't know what to say," she says. When she looked down to compose her thoughts during a disagreement with a colleague in a meeting several years ago, the colleague assumed she lacked confidence and hammered away even harder, Ms. Contini says.
Afterward, another participant in the meeting criticized her averted gaze, saying, "You looked like you were questioning yourself, and it made him feel, 'Yeah, I'm right!' " she says. With coaching from Mr. Decker, she learned to look people in the eye when under pressure. When a different co-worker challenged her in a recent meeting, she took a deep breath and kept eye contact while countering his points. He backed down, says Ms. Contini, co-founder of Synergy Sales Training, Los Gatos, Calif.
Watching yourself speak on videotape can raise awareness. Kiran Bhageshpur, an engineering vice president for a Seattle company, tried that during a coaching session with Mr. Decker. He realized that when he was uncertain about a topic he was discussing, "instinctively I wouldn't make eye contact, and that comes across as a negative," he says. He changed his habits and has since had more than 30 subordinates on his leadership team take similar training.
Corporate trainer Michelle Kruse says that as an introvert, she used to look down at her notes during meetings, or "hang out by the food" at social gatherings, partly because she felt uncomfortable making eye contact. "If somebody came to talk to me, I could look at the food and talk to them about that," she says. When speaking to groups, she avoided eye contact or scanned the room. Practice in front of a mirror helped her to see herself as others saw her. Learning to forge connections through eye contact helped her get audiences more engaged during presentations, says Ms. Kruse, vice president of learning at FortuneBuilders, San Diego.
Culture can be a factor. In many Eastern and some Caribbean cultures, meeting another's eyes can be rude. Asians are more likely than Westerners to regard a person who makes eye contact as angry or unapproachable, says a 2013 study in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE.
Too much eye contact can cause problems, too. At work, holding eye contact for more than 10 seconds can seem aggressive, empty or inauthentic, Mr. Decker says. In a social context, it may be seen as a sign of romantic interest, or just plain creepy. A study published this year in Applied Neuropsychology: Adult found questioners who gazed intently into participants' eyes while administering a test unnerved them so much that their working-memory performance was impaired.
Marisa Benson met with a colleague a few years ago who gazed intently at her for several minutes while they worked on a problem. But after they finished "and it was time to say, 'Thank you very much, I'll see you later,' it just didn't stop," says Ms. Benson of Atlanta, an administrative manager.
"If somebody has eye contact with you for more than 20 seconds, it's like, 'Ooh. There's that icky part.' You think, 'Can't you at least glance away and look at the window?' " Eventually, Ms. Benson deliberately dropped her pencil and leaned over to pick it up. Then, she says, "I stood up—and decided we were done."


Getty Images
How do people gauge their career progress: Praise from the boss? Landing a promotion? Scoring an office with a window?
Another important leading indicator is often missed – the amount of eye contact received from co-workers and supervisors. If the boss looks at you longer than at your co-workers during conversations or meetings, it may be a sign your star is rising.
A growing body of research shows eye contact signals status and influence in both one-on-one conversations and group meetings. High-status people receive more visual attention from their conversation partners, says a 2009 research review in the journal, Image and Vision Computing.
People who are seen as lacking in influence, however, get less eye contact from influential participants in meetings, according to another study published in 2010 in the Journal of Nonverbal Behavior. The pattern is strongest among male bosses, says the study of 17 work teams composed of a total of 94 people in several workplaces.
The most dominant person in a small group spends more time speaking than others, and also looks longer at others when speaking, the study says. Gazing into others’ eyes is a way of dominating the conversation. High-status women use even more eye contact than men to establish their dominance during meetings, the study says. The demands on women managers may cause them to feel “they need to be tougher than a man to succeed at the workplace,” the study says.
But when researchers assessed “visual egalitarianism” – the degree to which speakers allocated their eye contact evenly among other meeting participants, regardless of status – high-status women tend to be more democratic than men, dividing their eye contact equally among all other participants in a group. High-status men tended to spend more time looking at other high-status participants.
Many people are unaware of the importance of eye contact in conveying a message, as reported in today’s “Work & Family” column. The nonverbal elements of a speaker’s presentation – passion, voice and “presence” as conveyed largely through facial expression and eye contact  – account for 65% of listeners’ evaluations, compared with only 35% that is based on the content of the presentation and the speaker’s apparent knowledge of the topic, according to research by Quantified Impressions, a communications analytics company.
“We see this over and over again: Everyone is focused on the words they’re saying, and they don’t realize that these nuances, and how they’re saying it, is sending an even stronger signal than their words,” says Briar Goldberg, director of feedback for Quantified Impressions.
Readers, are you ever annoyed by bosses’ or co-workers lack of eye contact? Have you been in a situation where a supervisor or colleague stopped looking at you? How did you interpret it? Do you consciously use eye contact to convey an impression or to influence or impress others?  If so, what works for you?
Write to Sue Shellenbarger at sue.shellenbarger@wsj.com

Why were Hollywood Stars and Productions Snubbed by Broadway Award Noms?

Does Tony Love Oscar? Why Nominations Show The Complicated Affair Between Broadway And Hollywood

By |
Pete Hammond
Comments (5)
 
 
 
 
 
aladdin-broadway-musicalDespite numerous “snubs” to the so-called Hollywood contingent that has taken Broadway by storm, this season today’s Tony Award nominations really prove just how reliant the Great White Way has become on movies.  I’m not just talking those big stars such as Denzel Washington or Daniel Radcliffe (chief among today’s snubees), but the actual movies themselves. Nineteen of those nominations went to Broadway-
1-bridges-of-madison-county_650Rocky-musical-to-open-on-Broadway-in-Februaryized musical versions of  Disney’s Aladdin, Woody Allen’s Bullets Over Broadway, Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky and Clint Eastwood’s The Bridges Of Madison County. Only Aladdin scored a Best New Musical nom. But Allen was nominated for his book (his first foray into musicals) based on his Oscar-nominated screenplay. Kelli O’Hara was the key nomination of four given to Bridges Of Madison County in the same role that won the original movie’s sole Oscar nomination for Meryl Streep. Eight-time Oscar winner Alan Menken is among the five nominations for Aladdin by reprising his Oscar-winning score and adding just enough new tunes to qualify for the Tonys too. Rocky’s leading actor Andy Karl grabbed the Best Actor equivalent of Stallone’s Best Actor Oscar nom in 1976 but is likely, just as Sly did, to lose to much stiffer competition in the category. But the musical version’s scenic design, with its spectacular boxing arena, is certain to be victorious on Tony night.
Related: Tony Noms’ Many Celebrity Snubs Leaves CBS Mulling What Might Have Been
MV5BMTUyMzg2MTQ2NV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMTQxODEzMQ@@__V1_SY500_SX355_AL_gentlemans-guide-to-love-and-murderAnd what about some of the other key nominees? Front-runner for Best New Musical is the zany farce A Gentlemen’s Guide To Love And Murder, which has — you guessed it — a movie to thank for its existence that led to its leading 10 Tony noms. It is based on the brilliant 1949  Ealing Studios comedy Kind Hearts And Coronets in which the immortal Alec Guinness played eight different murder victims, just as Tony nominee for Best Actor in a Musical Jefferson Mays does in this re-invention of the material that lives on as a classic screen comedy. And even If/Then, which grabbed a couple of noms for star Idina Menzel and its score, is, to put it politely, a real ripoff of a movie. It’s central concept of telling two concurrent versions of the same person’s life has been compared in nearly every critical review to the 1998 Gwyneth Paltrow film Sliding Doors. I also would  venture to say the latest Broadway revival of Les Miserables, the show that spawned the 2012 movie version that was a box office hit, was nominated for Best Picture and won three Oscars,  is most likely due to renewed interest because of that very movie version. It is nominated for three Tonys including Best Revival of a Musical.
Related: Disney’s Broadway Trio Combines For $4 Million Week
So with all this seemingly Tony and Broadway love for the movies, it was curious to me why so many screen names — the list also includes Michelle Williams in Cabaret, Zachary Quinto in The Glass Menagerie, James Franco in Of Mice And Men, Zach Braff in Bullets Over Broadway — were left out in large numbers even as many of their co-stars who are creatures of the theatre were given Tony love. Is this a kind of snobbery at work here or just the way the cookie crumbles? Three of Washington’s co-stars were nominated, just not him for A Raisin In The Sun  (though he has a Tony for Fences), and Radcliffe with The Cripple Of Inishmaan has been overlooked now in all three times at bat on Broadway (also How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying and Equus). Does the theater community really hold eight Harry Potter movies against this talented actor?
Related: Off-Broadway’s Signature Theatre Gets First Tony Award Of The 2013-14 Season
1_168942Of course the Broadway/Hollywood connection is nothing new. And it works both ways. Later this year we will see the latest cinematic incarnations of iconic Broadway musicals including Stephen Sondheim’s Into The Woods directed by Rob Marshall, who also helmed the movie version of Chicago, the last movie tuner to win a Best Picture Oscar; the third film version of Annie after previous tries by John Huston and Marshall himself with an ABC telefilm; and Eastwood’s take on Jersey Boys. This reps Eastwood’s first connection with a Broadway property since he co-starred with Lee Marvin and Jean Seberg, non-singers all, in the 1970 movie musical disaster Paint Your Wagon. Maybe that film was one reason Broadway never really has forgiven Hollywood while all the time feeding off of it. Wonder what Eastwood thinks of this year’s stab at his Bridges Of Madison County.
Related: Hot Trailer: Clint Eastwood’s ‘Jersey Boys’


TonyAwards

Nevertheless the steady stream of Hollywood movies turned into Broadway musicals is only  going to intensify. In addition to all this year’s Tony nominees, still running in New York are film-to-stage adaptations of The Lion King, Newsies, Once, The Phantom Of The Opera (longest runner of all time), and last year’s Best Musical champ Kinky Boots.  There are several more in various stages of development including  Bull Durham, Pretty Woman, Finding Neverland, The Princess Bride, Charlie And The Chocolate Factory and even this year’s documentary Oscar winner Twenty Feet From Stardom. But taking an iconic film doesn’t always mean instant success, obviously. A couple of seasons ago, a straight play version of Breakfast At Tiffany’s was attempted but closed quickly. That was even a longer run than an ill-fated 1966 Broadway musical version of Tiffany’s with Mary Tyler Moore and Richard Chamberlain that basically closed before it could open. And Big Fish came and went last year after fewer than 100 performances. The obvious attraction to these projects is instant name recognition, and that’s something that Broadway producers have in common with their Hollywood counterparts: the desire for a sure thing. Disney has been the best at living in both worlds, and you can bet the farm that Frozen will be hitting the Great White Way. Just about every studio has someone assigned to comb their vaults for Broadway potential. New York just can’t get enough of Hollywood when it means money.
Related: NY Theater Awards Season Heats Up With Drama Desk Nominations
The ironic thing is the Tony Award show itself (airing June 8 on CBS) almost always wins the Emmy over the Oscar Show. And so it goes.

Microphones Made With Magic Of Alchemy, Science Of Sound


Host Jacki Lyden digs deep into the history of the microphone and visits a couple who carefully build microphones modeled after some of the world's legendary microphones. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on April 20, 2008.)
Copyright © 2013 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.
JACKI LYDEN, HOST:
If you're just tuning in, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.
Now, we go back to a story we first heard a few years ago. It's about an object that's touched and transformed your life in ways you might never have considered. In fact, I'm using one right now.
(SOUNDBITE OF TAPPING ON MICROPHONE)
LYDEN: Testing one, two, three. It's the microphone. We, of course, are people of the microphone here at NPR. We were intrigued by a story we heard about a boutique microphone operation.
Two people, a husband and wife, creating microphones at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Southwestern Virginia. We drove six hours listening to Ella Fitzgerald up ridge backs, through hollers and passing double-wide trailers and lawns ornamented with lots of lawn art.
Finally, we were in Floyd County, Virginia, where up on Horse Ridge Road, John and Mary Peluso not only create microphones, they also tend to a couple dozen sheep and lambs and two very fetching llamas.
MARY PELUSO: Dolly and Lori.
JOHN PELUSO: You got to have a Dolly llama.
(LAUGHTER)
LYDEN: Mary and John Peluso moved to Floyd County eight years ago from Chicago. John had worked with mics for years in the city's recording studios. Now, he and Mary rise before dawn to make their own microphones. They're modeled after some of the world's legendary mics but priced for mere mortals.
PELUSO: And these are the diaphragms.
LYDEN: John Peluso pulls out a microphone diaphragm, an impossibly thin sliver of plastic sensitive enough to quiver with the vibration of a voice or an instrument. The vibration in the diaphragm begins the process of converting sound waves into electricity.
PELUSO: It's got 300 atoms of gold on it, which is a very small amount of gold. And it says - like a drumhead, I can tune it.
LYDEN: With your finger.
PELUSO: Yeah.
LYDEN: Like any good instrument, a microphone diaphragm has to be in tune. And for that, John uses a tank of dry nitrogen and his closest ally, his ears.
(SOUNDBITE OF MICROPHONE DIAPHRAGM)
PELUSO: We're listening for a certain tone.
(SOUNDBITE OF MICROPHONE DIAPHRAGM)
PELUSO: John has the unique ability to take these bits and pieces of matter, metal and transform them into an instrument. And it is a form of magic.
LYDEN: Creating microphones, as the Pelusos do, requires both a conjuring of alchemy and the science of sound. In his career as an engineer, Peluso would eventually work with all the classic microphones, mics from RCA, Sony, AKG, Neumann. But he knew little of what he calls the black art of making microphones until he went to work for a mysterious Latvian physicist named Verner Ruvalds.
PELUSO: The day I met Verner, they had just had an elevator crash. Verner was at the bottom of the elevator shaft, and I put him in my car and drove him three blocks to the local hospital. They bandaged him up, and I drove him back to the studio, and he commenced to give us the five-cent tour.
LYDEN: Wow. And the rest, as they say, is history.
PELUSO: And the rest is history, yeah.
LYDEN: Ruvalds had volumes to impart about the soul of a microphone.
PELUSO: What he would tell me is intricacies of the technology: why it did what it did, why it sounded the way it sounded. You know, we would talk two, three hours at night after our work.
LYDEN: But there were other things about which Verner Ruvalds was reticent, such as his own part in the lineage of the microphone, a lineage that went from the fabled Neumann microphone factory in Berlin straight to the heart of the Third Reich.
(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)
LYDEN: The 1936 Berlin Olympics reached the world through the groundbreaking Neumann bottle microphone. Chancellor Adolf Hitler declared the games begun.
(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)
ADOLF HITLER: (Foreign language spoken)
LYDEN: The Neumann bottle mic, a big canister with a head on it like a golf ball, was designed in 1928 by Georg Neumann. It was a technological breakthrough. Neumann took the old carbon grain microphone that sounded like a telephone and turned it into a mass-produced condenser microphone. Remember the vibrations of that impossibly thin diaphragm? Here, for the first time, that diaphragm was one-tenth the width of a human hair. So thin it could respond to the most minute vibration, making the output clearer, closer, more authoritative. The Neumann bottle mic gave the human voice its full range and intimacy.
KLAUS HEYNE: The Third Reich - Hitler and Gerbils and all these other people - used that technology to their advantage.
LYDEN: Klaus Heyne is the owner of a company called German Masterworks and an expert in vintage microphones.
HEYNE: They could, for the first time, not only transport the words and the information, but they could transport emotion. And that was revolutionary.
LYDEN: The Neumann mic was so widely used by the Fuhrer that Klaus Heyne says it acquired a nickname. Listen closely.
HEYNE: The Hitler flasche, the Hitler bottle. And this was truly used and is still being used today, unashamedly, as the name for this microphone.
LYDEN: After the war, the Neumann factory took some of the exact same technology that had gone into the Hitler bottle microphone and put it into a new microphone that would transform the American studio sound. High fidelity meet the crooners.
(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "COME FLY WITH ME")
FRANK SINATRA: (Singing) Come fly with me, let's fly, let's fly away.
LYDEN: You're listening to the U47, the first condenser microphone that, with the flick of a switch, could go from picking up sound from all directions to picking up sound in the shape of a heart. Of course, old Blue Eyes loved it.
(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "COME FLY WITH ME")
SINATRA: (Singing) Come fly with me, let's float down to Peru. In llama land there's a one-man band and he'll toot his flute for you...
LYDEN: Ella Fitzgerald and Louie Armstrong used it, so did Bing Crosby and countless others. And a handful of guys from the other side of the pond used the U47 and its successor, the U48.
(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FROM ME TO YOU")
THE BEATLES: (Singing) If there's anything I can do just call on me and I'll send it along with love from me to you.
LYDEN: In fact, says John Peluso...
PELUSO: It's hard to find a record recorded in the '50s or '60s that didn't have U47s on them.
LYDEN: So naturally, the U47, with its smooth musical tone, is one of the main microphones the Pelusos try to replicate in their shop. Looking up, we see a silver parade of the 13 different kinds of mic he assembles. At each step, they're meticulously tested.
PELUSO: This machine is vibrating that diaphragm at a million times a second.
LYDEN: And tested...
(SOUNDBITE OF MICROPHONE FEEDBACK)
PELUSO: A little feedback. So the microphone is working now. That's the feed from the headphone.
LYDEN: ...and retested. The result? A microphone like the Peluso 22 47 LE. Beget by the Neumann U47, beget by the Neumann bottle microphone, this new mic costs a couple thousand dollars. The U47 can range up to $15,000. The Pelusos' cheapest mic is just a few hundred bucks. So by now, maybe you'd like to hear the sound of a Peluso microphone. Well, here's the music of Blue Highway, largely recorded on Peluso microphones.
(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THROUGH THE WINDOW OF A TRAIN")
BLUE HIGHWAY: (Singing) Everybody drives the same old roads these days. Don't see a thing, but they know the way. Every mile's a marker, every town's the same...
LYDEN: This is NPR News.