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Thursday, April 30, 2015

A PARTIAL LITERATURE LIST FOR ACTORS


There are a tremendous number of books on the industry. These are older texts which remain solid and should be available at low or no cost through libraries or the Internet. Feel free to submit current books or books you recommend to SAG Actor at nevadasag@me.com

BOOKS ON CAMERA / STAGE ACTING TECHNIQUES, YOUR CAREER &
THE BUSINESS, AND RELATED TOPICS

Primary

AUDITION, Michael Shurtleft, Pub. 1978
    Basics of auditioning for theater, contains many good techniques for study
YOUR FILM ACTING CAREER, M.K. Lewis & Rosemary Lewis, Pub. 1983
    Basics of the industry
HOW TO ACT AND EAT AT THE SAME TIME: THE BUSINESS OF LANDING 
    A PROFESSIONAL ACTING JOB Tom Logan, Pub. 1982
    The basics of photos, resumes, getting the audition, landing the part
THE STANISLAVSKI SYSTEM, THE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING OF AN
    ACTOR, Sonia Moore, Pub. 1960.  Guide to one acting system.

Click on "read more" below to continue and find other sources and directions.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Director Julie Taymor Steers A 'Grounded' Portrait Of A Drone Pilot



Anne Hathaway plays a nameless drone pilot in Julie Taymor's latest directing project, Grounded.
Anne Hathaway plays a nameless drone pilot in Julie Taymor's latest directing project, Grounded.
Joan Marcus/Courtesy of The Public Theater 
 
For a certain kind of theater goer, the name Julie Taymor is enough to get them to the box office. Ticket holders outside New York's Public Theater call her a "pioneer" and a "terrific director." They're waiting to see Taymor's new play, Grounded — an intimate, political, one-woman show that seems to be the opposite of what the director is known for, which is spectacle.

Taymor was the creative force behind The Lion King, one of the longest-running and best-selling shows on Broadway, and she's also known for the notoriously expensive and troubled musical adaptation of Spider-Man. She left that production before it officially opened, something theater goer Susan Jacobsen makes note of. "Unfortunately, I think Spider-Man just undid her reputation," she says.

Julie Taymor also directed the films Frida and Across the Universe. i
Julie Taymor also directed the films Frida and Across the Universe.
Marco Grob/Courtesy of Slate PR 
 
But when you ask Taymor about Spider-Man, as NPR did during a recent visit to her sunny loft apartment, she's nonplussed. "It [was] four years ago," she says. "I'll just say that I loved the ideas, I loved creating it and there [are] a lot of reasons why that thing fell apart. ... It's so past, it's so over."

Her new play is the antithesis of Spider-Man. It tells the story of daily life for a fighter pilot who carries out U.S. drone missions. Anne Hathaway plays the swaggering flyer obsessed with blue skies and destroying the enemy. After pregnancy and maternity leave take her out of the pilot seat, she's reassigned to a different seat. Yes, she'll be flying again, but, as she says to her husband, her new job has a catch:
I can't look Eric in the eye when I tell him. UAVs, unmanned aerial vehicles, drone pilot — a proud member of the Chair Force. He says, "When do you leave?" I say, "When do we leave." He says "What?" I say, "How do you feel about Vegas?" He says, "What?" I say, "I will be in the war by way of Las Vegas. I will operate out of Creech Air Force Base in Nevada. I will not live on the base; there are no barracks on the base. I will work seven days a week, a 12 hour shift, and each night I will come home.
For Hathaway's nameless pilot, the war takes place on a stage that's little more than a layer of sand and a single metal chair with a wall of black reflective glass behind her. Through lights, music and computer projections, the audience follows her to a Vegas showroom, along a Nevada highway and into the trailer where she spends her shift scanning gray-scale drone surveillance feeds for bodies. That's despite the fact that playwright George Brant wrote hardly any stage instructions in his script.

"It was a very interesting challenge to figure out what to do visually that would not overwhelm the solo actor," Taymor says. "The stage directions, the action that she does, is all there to support the story, never to compete with it."

In one scene, Taymor projects yellow lines onto the stage to simulate a highway. She says they "really play with [the character's] love of speed, but also the travel every day. Her life is this constant 12 hours here, 12 hours ... at home."

The set for Grounded consists of little more than a layer of sand, a metal chair and a background of black reflective glass.
The set for Grounded consists of little more than a layer of sand, a metal chair and a background of black reflective glass.
Joan Marcus/Courtesy of The Public Theater 
 
When the character is in the drone trailer, Taymor uses sound and music to communicate the tense nature of the work. "Her pulse is going and she's sweating and all of that," the director says. "The music is really her energy and she needs to decompress in a big way. And it's also for the audience — you need a break from dialogue."

Taymor's big production experience made her extra cautious when it came to overshadowing the pilot with effects, so she tried to keep things simple. "There's only one chair," she says. "The Chair Force — the idea of having to be stuck in a BarcaLounger 12 hours a day — is a pretty meaningful piece of furniture in her life. And we're able to then use that chair to become the bed, to become the psychiatrist couch. And Anne just has to turn it a little bit, shift her body, minimal movement — minimal — and you get a whole new location."

Grounded's political content also marks a departure from Taymor's previous work. "I somehow stayed with the classics and with other kinds of works and have never been asked to do a contemporary play, so this was fresh for me," she says. "And the subject matter was so — it was invigorating and disturbing. The last five months that I've had to do the research has been both. It has been 'Oh my God, I can't believe what we're doing,' and at the same time, 'Wow, if we can get this out.'"

Taymor hopes the play will help show people that drone pilots can also fall victim to post-traumatic stress. She says, "They have it because something that is very different that you learn in this play is that when she was a fighter pilot, she'd drop a bomb, but she was long gone — she never saw the effect. Where now they have to sit and linger over the bombs that are dropped and they see body parts. They see the destruction in a way that's a good thing because it's not a video game — it's not clean and pretty. But we, the public who ask these men and women to do this work for our country, have to understand that it is a very tough life. They are safe physically, but their minds are not safe."

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/28/402641742/director-julie-taymor-steers-a-grounded-portrait-of-a-drone-pilot

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Tony Award Nominations: Bradley Cooper, Helen Mirren, Elisabeth Moss (Complete List)


tonys-split
Kristin Chenoweth and Alan Cumming will host Broadway’s biggest evening.
The Tony Award nominations were unveiled on Tuesday morning, with “An American in Paris” and “Fun Home” leading the way with 12 nods apiece. “Something Rotten!” was nominated in 10 categories, “The King and I” had nine and “Wolf Hall Parts 1 & 2” pulled eight.

As also announced around 8:30 a.m. ET, Kristin Chenoweth and Alan Cumming will emcee the evening. The former is also nominated for Best Leading Actress in a Musical for “On the Twentieth Century.”

Bradley Cooper, Helen Mirren and “Mad Men’s” Elisabeth Moss were among the first wave of names called. Other Hollywood notables include Ruth Wilson, Bill Nighy, and Carey Mulligan, among other crossover screen and stage stars.

Below is the full list of nominees:

Best Play
“Disgraced” by Ayad Akhtar
“Hand to God” by Robert Askins
“The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” by Simon Stephens
“Wolf Hall Parts One & Two” by Hilary Mantel and Mike Poulton

Best Musical
“An American in Paris”
“Fun Home”
“Something Rotten!”
‘The Visit’
Best Revival of a Play
“Skylight”
“The Elephant Man”
“This Is Our Youth”
“You Can’t Take It With You”
Best Revival of a Musical
“On the Town”
“On the Twentieth Century”
“The King and I”
Best Book of a Musical
Karey Kirkpatrick and John O’Farrell, “Something Rotten!”
Lisa Kron, “Fun Home”
Craig Lucas, “An American in Paris”
Terrence McNally, “The Visit”
Best Leading Actor in a Play
Steven Boyer, “Hand to God”
Bradley Cooper, “The Elephant Man”
Ben Miles, “Wolf Hall Parts One & Two”
Bill Nighy, “Skylight”
Alex Sharp, “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”
Best Leading Actress in a Play
Geneva Carr, “Hand to God”
Helen Mirren, “The Audience”
Elisabeth Moss, “The Heidi Chronicles”
Carey Mulligan, “Skylight”
Ruth Wilson, “Constellations”
Best Leading Actor in a Musical
Michael Cerveris, “Fun Home”
Robert Fairchild, “An American in Paris”
Brian d’Arcy James, “Something Rotten!”
Ken Watanabe, “The King and I”
Tony Yazbeck, “On the Town”
Best Leading Actress in a Musical
Kristin Chenoweth, “On the Twentieth Century”
Leanne Cope, “An American in Paris”
Beth Malone, “Fun Home”
Kelli O’Hara, “The King and I”
Chita Rivera, “The Visit”
Best Score
John Kander and Fred Ebb, “The Visit”
Wayne Kirkpatrick and Karey Kirkpatrick, “Something Rotten!”
Sting, “The Last Ship”
Jeanine Tesori and Lisa Kron, “Fun Home”
Best Scenic Design of a Musical
Bob Crowley and 59 Productions, “An American in Paris”
David Rockwell, “On the Twentieth Century”
Michael Yeargan, “The King and I”
David Zinn, “Fun Home”
Best Orchestrations
Christopher Austin, Don Sebesky and Bill Elliott, “An American in Paris”
John Clancy, “Fun Home”
Larry Hochman, “Something Rotten!”
Rob Mathes, “The Last Ship”
Best Costume Design of a Play
Bob Crowley, “The Audience”
Jane Greenwood, “You Can’t Take It With You”
Christopher Oram, “Wolf Hall Parts One & Two”
David Zinn, “Airline Highway”
Best Lighting Design of a Play
Paule Constable, “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”
Paule Constable and David Plater, “Wolf Hall Parts One & Two”
Natasha Katz, “Skylight”
Japhy Weideman, “Airline Highway”
Best Director of a Musical
Sam Gold, “Fun Home”
Casey Nicholaw, “Something Rotten!”
John Rando, “On the Town”
Bartlett Sher, “The King and I”
Christopher Wheeldon, “An American in Paris”
Best Scenic Design of a Play
Bunny Christie & Finn Ross, “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”
Bob Crowley, “Skylight”
Christopher Oram, “Wolf Hall Parts One & Two”
David Rockwell, “You Can’t Take It With You”
Best Featured Actor in a Play
Matthew Beard, “Skylight”
K. Todd Freeman, “Airline Highway”
Richard McCabe, “The Audience”
Alessandro Nivola, “The Elephant Man”
Nathaniel Parker, “Wolf Hall Parts One & Two”
Micah Stock, “It’s Only a Play”
Best Featured Actress in a Musical
Victoria Clark, “Gigi”
Judy Kuhn, “Fun Home”
Sydney Lucas, “Fun Home”
Ruthie Ann Miles, “The King and I”
Emily Skeggs, “Fun Home”
Best Director of a Play
Stephen Daldry, “Skylight”
Marianne Elliott, “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”
Scott Ellis, “You Can’t Take It With You”
Jeremy Herrin, “Wolf Hall Parts One & Two”
Moritz von Stuelpnagel, “Hand to God”
Best Featured Actress in a Play
Annaleigh Ashford, “You Can’t Take It With You”
Patricia Clarkson, “The Elephant Man”
Lydia Leonard, “Wolf Hall Parts One & Two”
Sarah Stiles, “Hand to God”
Julie White, “Airline Highway”
Best Lighting Design of a Musical
Donald Holder, “The King and I”
Natasha Katz, “An American in Paris”
Ben Stanton, “Fun Home”
Japhy Weideman, “The Visit”
Best Choreography
Joshua Bergasse, “On the Town”
Christopher Gattelli, “The King and I”
Scott Graham & Steven Hoggett, “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time”
Casey Nicholaw, “Something Rotten!”
Christopher Wheeldon, “An American in Paris”
Best Featured Actor in a Musical
Christian Borle, “Something Rotten!”
Andy Karl, “On the Twentieth Century”
Brad Oscar, “Something Rotten!”
Brandon Uranowitz, “An American in Paris”
Max von Essen, “An American in Paris”

Best Costume Design of a Musical
Gregg Barnes, “Something Rotten!”
Bob Crowley, “An American in Paris”
William Ivey Long, “On the Twentieth Century”
Catherine Zuber, “The King and I”
And here are the nominees by the numbers:
Tony Nominations by Production
“An American in Paris” – 12
“Fun Home” – 12
“Something Rotten!” – 10
“The King and I” – 9
“Wolf Hall Parts One & Two” – 8
“Skylight” – 7
“The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” – 6
“Hand to God” – 5
“On the Twentieth Century” – 5
“The Visit” – 5
“You Can’t Take It with You” – 5
“Airline Highway” – 4
“The Elephant Man” – 4
“On the Town” – 4
“The Audience” – 3
“The Last Ship” – 2
“Constellations” – 1
“Disgraced” – 1
“Gigi” – 1
“The Heidi Chronicles” – 1
“It’s Only a Play” – 1
“This Is Our Youth” – 1

Sunday, April 19, 2015

The Official E-Newsletter of the Nevada Local

April 2015

HOW TO FOLLOW SAG-AFTRA ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Anna Wendt

By Anna Wendt

Most union members now use social media on a regular basis. Just in case you aren’t connected to the various SAG-AFTRA social media Twitter feeds, Instagram and Facebook pages, I have listed the links below. If you don’t already have an account on these social media sites, you will need to create one.

Remember, none of these sites replace official communication from SAG-AFTRA. To make sure you are on the email list, log into your account on SAGAFTRA.org and check your profile. Here is the link to the SAG-AFTRA Nevada Local page, telling you how you can submit or update your email address for SAG-AFTRA Nevada Local communications.

SAG-AFTRA:

Facebook

Instagram

YouTube

Twitter

News and press releases from SAG-AFTRA on Twitter.

New Media

SAG FOUNDATION:

Facebook
Twitter

Anna Wendt is the editor of the Nevada Star.

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Maslow's Human Needs Humans need food, sleep, safety, love, purpose. Psychologist Abraham Maslow ordered our needs into a hierarchy. This week, TED speakers explore that spectrum of need, from primal to profound.

i Bigstock

Maslow's Human Needs

Humans need food, sleep, safety, love, purpose. Psychologist Abraham Maslow ordered our needs into a hierarchy. This week, TED speakers explore that spectrum of need, from primal to profound.

http://www.npr.org/programs/ted-radio-hour/399796647/maslows-human-needs?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20150418